Skip to main content

Vol. III. New Series. SEPTEMBER, 1907. No. 9. Monmouthshire. ARELY has the Connexion had a richer opening than is now pre¬ sented to it in Monmouthshire. The valleys of the County are being opened up in an extra ordinary way. Rhymney, Sirhowy, and Ebbw—the coal industry is quickly changing them beyond all recogni¬ tion. The population is increasing at a rate so fast that figures swell from day to day, and the satistician's records rise abnormally. Neither Church nor State can cope with such a growfli; neither preacher nor politician can keep pace with it. At this very hour there are openings for new causes in twelve places. Some of these places are towns of considerable size; others are new villages, now in the making. Take Blackwood, for instance. Blackwood is a town of some importance, growing and to grow. We have not a single church there. True, we have a church at Rock, a mile out of the town ; but in the town itself, with its rising activity, we are quite unrepresented. Take Rhymney again. Rhymney, with Pontlottyn, is a centre of very considerable business. We have three Welsh churches there ; but there is immediate need of an English church also. Then, take Bargoed. Before long, Bargoed will be another Pont¬ ypridd. It is a railway centre where com¬ mercial possibilities are very great indeed. At present we have one Welsh church in Bargoed, with one English church just stai-ted in Aberbargoed. There is an op- portunity in Bargoed for the immediate starting of another church again. These are instances of open doors now before us. Twelve new causes ! That is our op¬ portunity. The Presbytery of Monmouth¬ shire is alive to the situation, and the brethren are beginning in earnest to tackle the problem which Providence is thus putting upon them. But though they do their best, that is not enough to meet the demand. Their resources are not ample enough. More money is wanted than they can (possibly afford. To start and to sustain, all at once, twelve new causes would overwhelm them,