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Mo Vol. III. New Series. JUNE, 1907. No. 6. The Forward Movement. OUR RESPONSIBILITY AND OUR OPPORTUNITY. EsssagTBgaasaa A^/^J f'S^v 'nj!y/& I Ij^Ja yj§f:'fA \ flKy/iyrvi Wmk W/w^ xma ITH the death of Dr. Pugh there comes to us a time of serious reflection. First, upon the enormous amount of work which he did; second, upon the work which his work compels us now to do. First, his work; second, our work. I. HIS WORK. We are not quite sure as to tie exact correctness of our figures; but we shall fol¬ low the statistics supplied by the Connex- ional Year Book, and tihey, we presume, will be fairly near the mark. On page 23 we find a list of the Causes which Dr. Pugh was the means of starting. They are forty-seven in number. Let us grasp the significance of such a figure. Within some sixteen years, Dr. Pugih helped to form over forty new causes. When we 'begin to think of it, we are inclined to ask whether such a record adorns the annals of the Christian Church anywhere since the days of Wesley and Harris. The fact is surely unique. Some of these Causes have meant the building or the buying of very large Halls. In Neath there is a Hall that accommodates 2,200 people; in Newport, 2,000. King's Hall, Swansea; Memorial Hall, Cardiff; Victoria Hall, Wrexham; St. David's Hall, Pontypool—these, and others like them, are large and commodious buildings. They stand for the large ideas which Dr. Pugh entertained, and they are monuments of the energy and persistence with which he pur¬ sued his work. All the Halls together are capable of accommodating at least 25,000 persons, and most of them are fairly well filled every Sunday. What an amount of devising and planning, of thinking and do¬ ing, all 'these Halls must have cost to him who, in the main, made them what they are. It is indeed an extraordinary record. It is practically the work of one man. In these Halls there is a body of 6,000 communicants. A very considerable addi¬ tion to our membership!