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Classics and Philology. 457 relative position to the goal. Proximus huic, quanto sed proximus intervallo! What " him and me," and our school-fellows accomplished in those days, may be seen in the Oxford and Cambridge Calendars. What Salo¬ pians are doing nozv-a.-da.ys, in ditto, ditto, and in many fields of competition that have since been opened, " in usum studiosae juventutis." [For both, see Sabrinae Cor¬ olla.] I advise those who aim at the like Philological distinctions, to beware of a Welsh, Irish, or Gaelic com¬ petitor, who has been accustomed to two languages from infancy. Er mag wohl Doppelkopf heissen. " Deuben ydyw Robin !" Enigmas. I—What Lawyer was, nominally, the most keen sighted ? 2—Who might be called the Sculptor " malgre lui." 3—What sort of a horse did Minerva give Bellerophon ? MATHEMATICS. Mary's Euclid.—Chap. VI. What I meant, at the end of the last chapter, was, that if you make ever so many pairs of adjacent angles that are equal, each to its neighbour, in those pairs ; then, each of the angles forming those pairs must be equal to all the rest, as well as equal to its neighbour; which is only another way of saying that " All right angles are equal," which you will see in Euclid's nth Axiom. And the reason I give is that, in making all these pairs, you are merely dividing the same thing into two halves, and " The