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N°- »•] [April, 1863?'•■'"'•=" OLD PRICE'S REMAINS. INTRODUCTION. In the minds of some (it is hoped of many) readers, four questions may very naturally arise. I. Who is Old Price? 2. Why Old Price's Remains? 3. Why Old Price's Remains ? 4. How Old ? 1st. Who is Old Price? Now nothing was further from his intention than to inflict an autobiography on the public. Nor indeed would the thing have been even named, but for the fact of at least one friend being under the impres¬ sion that such was to be the nature of the proposed work ; perhaps supposing the old gentleman was just alive, and no more; in which case the words " Remains" and "Life" might be considered in a certain sense synonymous. It is in fact almost as difficult to describe, truly, one's own manner of life, as to predict truly the manner of one's death. No such task is to be attempted in these pages. Yet who would find fault with the Author, if in the course of the work, indirectly— '' Votiva pateat tanquam depicta tabelltl " Vita senis ? " However, the first question, being a very proper one from strangers, may be briefly answered without incurring the charge of auto-gra-phy; still less the risk of an Auto-da-fe. A MS. letter is extant from Mrs. Yorke, of Dyffryn Aled, to her daughter Diana, an extract from which is copied upon the back of the Frontispiece.