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THE CAMBRIAN JOURNAL ALBAN >«UCH»^/JK EILIR (vernal eqttinox.) THE CELTS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. AN APPEAL TO THE LIVING REPRESENTATIVES OF THE CELTIC RACE. By Charles de Gaulle. Translated from the original French by J. Davenport Mason. INTRODUCTION. In the following history of the " Celts of the Nineteenth Century," there is much that will interest the members of the Cambrian Institute, coming, as it does, from a learned foreigner, who is evidently actuated by a desire to promote the welfare of the Celtic people; still there are many of his remarks, more especially those on religion, and with regard to the union of the Welsh, Irish, and Scotch with the English, and of the Bretons with the French, with which we do not agree. These unions, which have existed for ages, are required by the geo¬ graphical position of the several countries, and a rupture now would be attended with the most disastrous conse¬ quences to all concerned. The objectionable passages are not given in the translation, as they are repugnant to our feelings of religion and loyalty. CAMB. JOUR., 1864. * B