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THE CAMBRIAN JOURNAL. ALBAN XL M ARTHAN. (WINTEK SOLSTICE.) THE CASE OF TENBY v. NARBERTH, TOUCHING A MARKET ESTABLISHED IN THE LATTER DURING THE COMMONWEALTH. The following documents will illustrate a very active principle in human nature,—" Let him take who can, and him keep who may." During the great struggle of the seventeenth century, few (if any) towns exhibited greater loyalty to the cause of Charles the First than Tenby. It was, moreover, an ancient municipal borough, and had aggregated to itself in feeling, and in fact, a right to be considered the centre of a large district into which the riches of the circuit were to be poured, and to which the residents of the surrounding country ought to peregrinate. The little village of Narberth, some eight or ten miles off, originating in the retainers of the Norman lord of its castle and manor, gradually grew into a centre convenient to another large district; and, as " buying and selling" then was no doubt found very convenient, a rivalry not unnaturally sprang up between the two centres of Tenby and Narberth, and the Civil War made the fulcrum on CAMB. JOUR., 1863. 2 G