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THE CAMBRIAN JOURNAL ALBAN XL tig ARTHAN. ("WINTER SOLSTICE.) AB ITHEL. When, on the 27th of August, 1862, from a lonely house in the Mervinian marshes, an hour before dawn, the spirit of John Williams ab Ithel returned to the Divine Fountain of Life, it is but simple truth to say that Cambria lost one of her worthiest, bravest, and most gifted sons. In him, indeed, equally by character and by descent, was set forth the type of her old great men—the patriotic fire of her princes—the pure morality of her saints—the simplicity and learning of her bards. In the language of one of the last, he was eminently " Coeth, doeth, drud, termud, tyner."1 And not to one section alone of Britain can his reputation be attached, or his praise confined. Not less by his writings than by his conduct is his name memo¬ rable. He has filled for twenty years a high and peculiar place in the archaic literature of the land. He has helped to show that there lies in the study of primeval ages, something which is deeply relevant to the humanity of to-day, and which will continue to be so while humanity exists. He has taught us, that the steady light of wisdom 1 Ardent, wise, bold, silent, tender.—Llywelyn Brydyddy Mock. CAMB. JOUR., 1862. 2 N