THE. CAMBRIAN MAGAZINE. NOVEMBER, 1813. HISTORY OF WALES, CHAP. III. SEC. III. Continued front page 6; Invasion of the Pids—Dispersion of the Britons—Embassy to the Saxons—Arrival, and exploits of the Saxon troops. A HROUGH what a wilder¬ ness of human calamity is the his-' torian necessarily conducted! He searches into the records of his fellow men, and sees evil stamped upon the first page: he goes on, and still beholds " lamentation, and mourning, and woe." He listens to the coming gale • but it is heaVy with melancholy tidings, while the appalling knell of War, " Far heard along th* inhospitable wastes. With sad-returning chime awakes new grief." The period of British history ton which we are how entering, is Strikingly calculated to awaken these reflections, and no one can desire to dwell on its'calamitous ▼ol. I. circumstances longer than is re¬ quisite to preserve the tissue of principal events unbroken. We will, therefore, dispatch it as speedily as proper attention to this point will allow. The Romans left the provincial Britons in possession of an exten¬ sive arid beautiful region^naturaHy fertile, but rendered still more luxuriant by culture, abounding in cities,towns,and villages, connect¬ ed by the most direct and durable highways ; ornamented with mo¬ numents of art, and labour; and the whole defended fr-orn northern, foes by ramparts, which might be well attributed to the agency of giants. But although thus sur¬ rounded With prosperous appear^ ances, the Britons felt themselves' forsaken and disconsolate when